Tuesday, November 12, 2013

The 87th Annual Bronzeville Veterans Day Parade 2013

video
Video by Aki Antonia ©2013
The sound of the drums are always so intoxicating…. 
There is absolutely no way that I can hear the drums of a parade pass by ... without me wanting to go… 
to see what the parade is for…
Next thing you know, I'm marching right along… all the way to the Victory Monument on 35th and King Drive 
for the 87th Annual Veterans Day Parade in Bronzeville 2013. Let's gO! Left, Left, Left, Right, Left!
video

The Star Spangled Banner - Take 6.
Video by Aki Antonia ©2013
(Click on the video to see the Parade 
and to hear the National Anthem by Take 6)

(BAB) The 87th Annual Veterans Day Parade in Bronzeville was presented by The Chicago Defender Charities Inc. and was led by Col. Eugene Scott. This year's presentation sponsors and supporters included The Giles Post #87 and State Farm Insurance.
Students from  a variety of Chicago Public Schools JROTC units gave an excellent presentation during the parade and a rousing sound off and taps at the ceremony at Victory Monument  on 35th and King Drive.


 Veterans salute as taps are played at the Victory Monument ceremony. 
2nd Ward Alderman,  Bob Fioretti speaks at the Veterans Day ceremony.
3rd Ward Alderman, Pat Dowell speaks at the Veterans Day ceremony.

Veterans, The National Guard, Aldermen and Dignitaries including the Consulate General of France-Chicago gave presentations during this very poignant  ceremony honoring our veterans. 
4th Ward Alderman, Will Burns speaks at the Veterans Day ceremony.
Cook County Board President, Toni Preckwinkle speaks at the Veterans Day ceremony.

Presenters included Col. Eugene F. Scott, Veteran, Rochelle Crump, Cook County Board President, Toni Preckwinkle, 2nd Ward Alderman, Bob Fioretti, 3rd Ward Alderman, Pat Dowell, 4th Ward Alderman, Will Burns and the Consulate General  of France-Chicago, Graham Paul who took a  touching moment to thank the African-American soldiers for their service in battles against France during the war.
A poem was read by Beverly Reed Scott and the National Anthem was sung by Trooper, Rick Murray.

The uniqueness of this 87th Annual Veterans Parade in Bronzeville is that this parade pays special attention to the African-American soldiers, who have always played a unique role in service to our country, even while they had to battle for their own rights at home as American citizens. 
At this parade there is usually representation from the African-American regiments of the military including the Buffalo Soldiers on horses…. and in the past I have met one of the actual  Tuskegee Airmen, who are also known as The Red Tails.

The ceremony is held at The Victory Monument on 35th and Martin Luther King Drive. The monument was erected by the people of Illinois in memory of the African-American soldiers who died in France from the 8th Infantry of the Illinois National Guard during World War I.
The Victory Monument
The Victory Monument was dedicated November 11, 1928 on Armistice Day. The bronze panels surrounding the base of the monument were sculpted by Leonard Crunelle, as well as the soldier standing on the top of the monument later added in 1936. 

The monument was erected by the people of Illinois in memory of the African-American soldiers who died in France from the 8th Infantry of the Illinois National Guard during World War I which was reorganized as the 370th Infantry of the 93rd Division of the United States Army.

I have passed by this statue many times in the course of my comings and goings in Bronzeville…but on  Veterans Day I am  reminded that this is no ordinary statute. 
This is the  Victory Monument!
Just to see the parade march down the majestic Boulevard of Martin Luther King Drive….. with its trees changing colors, the drums and flags waving…… and the students' precise performance is always very moving to me. 

Welcome to the 87th Annual Veterans Day Parade in Bronzeville!













As the rain trickled down and taps were played…  
and the Star Spangled Banner was sung acapella by Trooper Rick Murray in a deep rich voice….  
We stood in reverence for our veterans at the Victory Mounument at the 87th Annual Veterans Day Parade ceremony in Bronzeville. 
Some of us brushed away the tears as we remembered our loved ones who have served in the military for our freedom. 
As performer, Lupe Fiasco says " Freedom 'aint  Free 'round my way"… 
We need to remember that everyday…. but particularly on  Veteran's Day. 
To many of us, our freedoms are taken for granted and war is an abstract concept … 
a late night  black & white movie about combat 
in a distant land….. in another time, 
but as I looked around… I saw veterans from wars across time…
from the Buffalo Soldiers riding horses..
to a man wearing a jacket with Iraq and Kuwait on the back.
There were even students in the military uniforms of the Revolutionary War.
When Cook County  Board President, Toni Preckwinkle spoke, 
she reminded us of the importance of one of the wars that affected many of us. 
She spoke on the importance of what had happened right here in   America's history in regards to the Civil War and the Emancipation Proclamation. 
She spoke about how this war and its outcome had a life changing effect on the nation and the world.
In light of this…I am including a few excerpts from a Proclamation that we may often point to….
but do we know what it actually says?

The Emancipation Proclamation

January 1, 1863


A Transcription
By the President of the United States of America:

A Proclamation.
Whereas, on the twenty-second day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two, a proclamation was issued by the President of the United States, containing, among other things, the following, to wit:

"That on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free; 

and the Executive Government of the United States, including the military and naval authority thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of such persons, and will do no act or acts to repress such persons, or any of them, in any efforts they may make for their actual freedom.

"That the Executive will, on the first day of January aforesaid, by proclamation, designate the States and parts of States, if any, in which the people thereof, respectively, shall then be in rebellion against the United States; and the fact that any State, or the people thereof, shall on that day be, in good faith, represented in the Congress of the United States by members chosen thereto at elections wherein a majority of the qualified voters of such State shall have participated, shall, in the absence of strong countervailing testimony, be deemed conclusive evidence that such State, and the people thereof, are not then in rebellion against the United States."

Now, therefore I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, by virtue of the power in me vested as Commander-in-Chief, of the Army and Navy of the United States in time of actual armed rebellion against the authority and government of the United States, and as a fit and necessary war measure for suppressing said rebellion, do, on this first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and in accordance with my purpose so to do publicly proclaimed for the full period of one hundred days, from the day first above mentioned, order and designate as the States and parts of States wherein the people thereof respectively, are this day in rebellion against the United States, the following, to wit:

Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, (except the Parishes of St. Bernard, Plaquemines, Jefferson, St. John, St. Charles, St. James Ascension, Assumption, Terrebonne, Lafourche, St. Mary, St. Martin, and Orleans, including the City of New Orleans) Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia, (except the forty-eight counties designated as West Virginia, and also the counties of Berkley, Accomac, Northampton, Elizabeth City, York, Princess Ann, and Norfolk, including the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth, and which excepted parts, are for the present, left precisely as if this proclamation were not issued.

And by virtue of the power, and for the purpose aforesaid, I do order and declare that all persons held as slaves within said designated States, and parts of States, are, and henceforward shall be free; and that the Executive government of the United States, including the military and naval authorities thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of said persons.

And I hereby enjoin upon the people so declared to be free to abstain from all violence, unless in necessary self-defence; and I recommend to them that, in all cases when allowed, they labor faithfully for reasonable wages.

And I further declare and make known, that such persons of suitable condition, will be received into the armed service of the United States to garrison forts, positions, stations, and other places, and to man vessels of all sorts in said service.

And upon this act, sincerely believed to be an act of justice, warranted by the Constitution, upon military necessity, I invoke the considerate judgment of mankind, and the gracious favor of Almighty God.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
Done at the City of Washington, this first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the eighty-seventh.


By the President: ABRAHAM LINCOLN 
WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.
All photos and video by Aki Antonia © 2013
111113 Post by Aki Antonia © 2013

Thursday, November 7, 2013

DuSable Museum A.W.E. is rocking….on November 8, 2013

To enlarge the image  pop the link!

A.W.E.
at the
DuSable Museum
740 East 56th Place
Chicago,Illinois
773 947-0600

Friday, November 8, 2013

For more info go to:
DuSable Museum